hepatitis
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hepatitis

Turns out that, Infectious Mononucleosis complications may result in liver problems such as hepatitis [7]! Image by: Freedigitalphotos.net

Infectious mononucleosis (IM) results from primary infection by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Humans are the only source of EBV and the virus has a worldwide distribution, with 90% positive rates among adults [11].
Primary EBV infection usually has no symptoms and occurs within the first three years of life.
However, in some cases, infection is often delayed until the second decade of life or later [1-4], where the actual illness is typically called Infectious Mononucleosis (IM).

IM Symptoms are quite a bummer- the symptoms include, extreme fatigue, fever, sore throat, head and body aches, swollen lymph nodes in the neck and armpits, swollen liver or spleen or both, rash [5-6]. And as someone who experienced IM let me tell you one thing, it really sucks!

The main purpose I told you all about IM is due to its possible complications.

Turns out that, Infectious Mononucleosis complications may result in liver problems such as hepatitis [7].

Turns out that, complications may result in liver problems such as hepatitis [7]. Yup! You heard well! Hepatitis is a medical condition and may be caused by other viruses than Hepatitis A B or C viruses. And it doesn’t end there, recently, EBV hepatitis has been described in patients without clinical features of IM [8-9].

According to a study, Hepatitis caused by EBV is common in IM, indicating that this virus is a relatively common cause of temporary hepatitis in children and youth [11]. And at the same time, EBV hepatitis can also affect an older age group of 60 year and more [10]. Therefore, diagnosing hepatitis should be done in all patients with unexplained hepatitis regardless of their age.

Hepatitis

In terms of natural remedies, there is a natural antiviral treatment on the market called Novirin and Gene-Eden-VIR. They were shown to reduce EBV symptoms in two post-marketing clinical studies followed FDA guidelines [12]. For more information click Here

Sounds concerning right?? I was too concerned the first time I discovered those facts. But then I searched for EBV treatments, and luckily there are few!

The current available antiviral drugs on the market include aciclovir, ganciclovir, penciclovir, and their respective prodrugs valaciclovir, valganciclovir and famciclovir. In addition, there is cidofovir, adefovir and foscarnet.

In terms of natural remedies, there is a natural antiviral treatment on the market called Novirin and Gene-Eden-VIR. They were shown to reduce EBV symptoms in two post-marketing clinical studies followed FDA guidelines [12].

In terms of natural remedies, there is a natural antiviral treatment on the market called Novirin and Gene-Eden-VIR. They were shown to reduce EBV symptoms in two post-marketing clinical studies followed FDA guidelines [12].

But then, you must be asking yourselves, what is the difference between the two products?? Well, Novirin shares the same formula as Gene-Eden-VIR, while Novirin has higher quality, more expensive ingredients. These natural remedies target latent viruses as well, making them highly recommended for preventing viral infections.

Most medical problems are beyond our power and control, in contrast to prevention of infection and disease. In order to prevent further liver damage we must be aware of EBV symptoms and possible complications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

1. Fry J. Infectious mononucleosis: Some new observations from a 15-year study. J Fam Pract.1980;10:1087–9.
2. Leach CT, Sumaya CV. Epstein-Barr virus. In: Cherry JD, Feign RD, editors. Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 5th edn. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Company; 2004. pp. 1932–56.
3. Henle W, Henle G. Epidemiologic aspects of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diseases.Ann NY Acad Sci. 1980;354:326–31.
4. Sumaya CV, Ench Y. Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis in children. I. Clinical and general laboratory findings. Pediatrics. 1985;75:1003–10.
5. Cohen JI. Epstein-Barr virus infection. N Engl J Med. 2000;343:481–92.
6. CDC.org – Epstein-Barr Virus and Infectious Mononucleosis – Fact Sheet. Page last updated: January 7, 2014
7. Weinstein M, O’Hare B. Hemoptysis and Epstein-Barr virus infection. Pediatr Infect Dis J.2000;8:760–1.
8. Canovic P, Gajović O, Todorović Z, Mijailović Z. Epstein–Barr virus hepatitis associated with icterus – a case report. Med Pregl 2006;4: 179–82.
9. Hinedi TB, Koff RS. Cholestatic hepatitis induced by Epstein–Barr virus infection in an adult. Dig Dis Sci 2003; 48: 539–41.
10. Vine LJ1, Shepherd K, Hunter JG, Madden R, Thornton C, Ellis V, Bendall RP, Dalton HR. “Characteristics of Epstein-Barr virus hepatitis among patients with jaundice or acute hepatitis.” Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Jul;36(1):16-21.
11. John Odame,1 Joan Robinson, MD FRCPC,2 Nasser Khodai-Booran, PhD,1 Simon Yeung, BSc,1 Tony Mazzulli, MD FRCPC,3 Derek Stephens, MSc,4 and Upton D Allen, MBBS MSc FRCPC1,4 “Correlates of illness severity in infectious mononucleosis.” Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol. 2014 Sep-Oct; 25(5): 277–280.
12. Gene-Eden-VIR Is Antiviral: Results of a Post Marketing Clinical Study. Published in September 2013.

 

 

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